How can Chiropractic help powerlifters?

How can Chiropractic help powerlifters?

The sport of power lifting is increasing popularity, with gyms installing more squat racks, benches and dead-lifting platforms. But how can Chiropractic help a power lifter?

Powerlifting consists of three lifts; the squat, the deadlift and the bench, however many power lifters will incorporate many more movements into their lifting programs such as shoulder press, front squats and safety bar squats to name a few. Many of these lifts cause compression of the spine especially the lower lumbar spine. This can result in low back pain, particularly lumbar disc injuries.

Chiropractic care can help to unload and decompress your spine, which will insure lifters longevity in the sport. There are many different techniques that chiropractors can use to help power lifters but here are just a few.

1. Manipulation

Restoring range of motion to the joints where they have become restricted from repetitive lifting will alleviate almost instantaneously some causes of spinal pain as well as dramatically increasing ones ability to lift. Special attention to the sacroiliac joints [SIJs], hips and thoracic spine will see the most impressive results.Improving range of motion at the SIJs and hips helps with the depth of squatting. Freeing up the thoracic spine will enable a more comfortable bar position during squatting, as well as enabling better posture during squatting and dead lifting.

2. Mobilisation

Mobilisation techniques are similar to manipulation techniques in that they improve joint range of motion. Mobilising the hip joints will provide a very beneficial stretch to the joint capsule. When addressing lower back complaints, a lack of hip motion can cause compensatory motion in the lumbar spine which in turn leads to increased shear stress and load to the spinal soft tissues.

3. Active Release Technique

This gold standard of soft tissue treatment is extremely effective for treating muscles, ligaments and nerves throughout the body. There are areas within the body which when treated, will greatly enhance performance of powerlifters in their sport. Treating the latissimus dorsi in combination with the lumbar erector spinae and lumbopelvic fascia will reduce tissue immobility and tightness. It also restores any irregularity in the normal functioning of these structures that can cause imbalances at the lumbopelvic region.

4. Massage

The dreaded tightness that follows tough workout sessions in the gym is a phenomenon powerlifters know all too well. Discomfort experienced when trying to tie shoe laces, bending forward or even moving to sit down on a chair can become very frustrating. This tightness can also be the reason for not returning to the gym sooner. A regular massage can help flush the body of the metabolic by-products of exercise and see you returning to the weight lifting room earlier and with reduced potential for incurring injury.

5. Rehabilitation

Individual rehab programs help powerlifts with any mobility or motor control (stability) issues that they have. Getting on top of these dysfunctions will help powerlifters to prevent injury and enhance their performance. See our previous blog post (hyperlink) for rehab exercises that will help with decompress the spine. Competitive powerlifters in particular, should seriously consider receiving regular treatment from a health practitioner. In the same way that your car needs servicing every six months or 10,000kms (whichever occurs sooner), so too does your body. You probably use your body more so than your car so book it in for a tune-up regularly and reap the benefits of preventative therapy that keeps you lifting longer and stronger.

If you have any questions about how chiropractic can help you give the clinic a call on (02) 99226116 or visit our clinic on the Ground Floor Suite 6, 157 Walker Street North Sydney for more information.

*DISCLAIMER: This discussion does not provide medical advice. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained in this discussion are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this discussion is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in this blog.

Headaches – Is your headache coming from your neck?

Headaches – Is your headache coming from your neck?

Headaches are a common condition that we treat at Cartwright Physicaltherapy. There are numerous different causes of headaches; one of the types of headaches we treat here regularly is cervicogenic headaches (CH).

But what are CH?

CH are headaches caused by a disorder of the neck and usually are accompanied by neck pain.

How do I know if I have a CH or another type of headache?

The typical features of a CH include unilateral (one sided) head pain that does not shift from side to side, pain is aggravated by external pressure on the same side of the upper neck, the neck may have limited range of motion and the headaches may be triggered by neck movements or sustained postures.

What is the best treatment for CH?

A recent study compared upper cervical (neck) and upper thoracic (upper back) manipulation/adjustments (high velocity low amplitude thrust techniques ) against mobilisations (slow, rhythmical, oscillating techniques). They found that the adjustment group had a greater reduction in neck pain and a larger decrease in headache intensity, frequency and duration when compared to the mobilisation group.The full article is attached at the bottom of this page.

Here at Cartwright Physical Therapy all our treatment of CH are individualised to the patient, although usually involve massage, A.R.T., rehabilitation exercises and adjustments (where appropriate).

If you have any questions on CH, headaches or neck pain or are suffering from CH or any other type of pain come in and see us or book an appointment today on (02) 9922 6116 or visit our clinic on the Ground Floor Suite 6, 157 Walker Street North Sydney for more information.

*DISCLAIMER: This discussion does not provide medical advice. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained in this discussion are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this discussion is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in this blog.

Shoulder pain – Impingement Syndrome

Shoulder pain – Impingement Syndrome

Have you ever noticed that you get pain with overhead movements like dumbbell shoulder press or even something as simple as putting the clothes on the line? You may have shoulder impingement syndrome.

Shoulder pain is the third most common condition that presents to a chiropractic clinic. Impingement syndrome is one of the most common shoulder issues that we treat (1).

Impingement syndrome can occur secondary to trauma to the shoulder but more commonly it occurs due to chronically held postures, muscular imbalances and repetitive movement.

First some anatomy

The shoulder joint is complex, when referring to shoulder impingement; people are most commonly referring impingement under the acromioclavicular joint or AC joint. The AC joint is made up of the proximal end of the acromion and the distal end of the clavicle (collar bone). Under the acromion there is the sub-acromial space, through this space runs three tendons of the rotator cuff, the long head of the biceps tendon and the subacromial bursa. When we perform overhead movements or have a slouched postured the size of this space decreases and the contents of the space can become compressed and irritated, leading the impingement symptoms (2).

Symptoms of shoulder impingement

The symptoms vary from person to person and with the degree of impingement.

Symptoms include

  • Pain on the anterior (front) or lateral (side) aspect of the shoulder Painfularc
  • Pain with overhead activities
  • Pain with repetitive movements
  • Pain with shoulder abduction painful arch
  • Popping or clicking in the shoulder
  • Weakness
  • Night pain
  • Pain relieved by rest or postural change (2)(3)

Treatment

Fortunately shoulder impingement can be treated successfully by conservative (non surgical) treatment. At Cartwright physical therapy we pride ourselves on our wide variety of treatment options.

  • Soft tissue work – Massage, active release technique
  • Dry needling
  • Joint mobilization
  • Joint manipulation
  • Individualised rehabilitation program for more information on exercises that are prescribed you can read our previous blog post on shoulder exercises

If you have any questions on shoulder pain or are suffering from shoulder pain or any other type of pain come in and see us or book an appointment today on 02 99226116 or visit our clinic on the Ground Floor, Suite 6, 157 Walker Street North Sydney for more information.

By Patrick Lind

*DISCLAIMER: This discussion does not provide medical advice. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained in this discussion are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this discussion is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in this blog.

 

  1. Pribicevic M, Pollard H, Bonello R. An epidemiologic survey of shoulder pain in chiropractic practice in australia. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2009;32(2):107-17.

  2. Seitz AL, McClure PW, Finucane S, Boardman ND, 3rd, Michener LA. Mechanisms of rotator cuff tendinopathy: intrinsic, extrinsic, or both? Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon). 2011;26(1):1-12.

  3. Kuhn JE. Exercise in the treatment of rotator cuff impingement: a systematic review and a synthesized evidence-based rehabilitation protocol. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2009;18(1):138-60.

Chiropractic meets Physiotherapy

A comparison of chiropractic and physiotherapy

I am always on the lookout for new techniques that may help my patients. In fact, most of you know that my own style of treatment has developed from a wealth of observation of chiropractors, physiotherapists, osteopaths and even massage therapists and yoga instructors.

Recently, with a twinge of back pain from training and playing tennis five days a week (silly me!), I decided to use this as an opportunity to see how a physiotherapist would treat me. I booked into a really expensive centre that comes with high accolades in the treatment of back pain. With a firm understanding on the likely approach a chiropractor would take to the complaint, I was interested to see how this approach would compare with that of a direct competitor.

My experience was extremely positive. I was very impressed with the physiotherapist’s diagnosis and felt very confident she both understood and had the skill to improve my complaint. Interestingly, her approach to the consultation in terms of the history taken, examination process and treating style, was very similar to that of my own. This was very reassuring, as it reflects a breaking down in the barrier between chiropractors and physiotherapists. I believe many people feel the two disciplines are arch rivals in a battle for patient market share.

Of course, treatment will vary greatly from one practitioner to the next. There are some chiropractors who solely use manipulation as their treatment modality. By the same token, there are some physiotherapists who prefer the use of heat lamps, ultrasound, interferential machines over manual techniques. I have noticed in my observations however, that more and more practitioners are recognising that patients need and deserve more than a simple manipulation or 15 minutes of acupuncture. Personally, I prefer the healing touch of a hands-on practitioner and as a result, I use my hands as much as possible in treating my patients.

The consultation with the physiotherapist incorporated mostly manual mobilisation techniques and exercise prescription. Mobilisation techniques are generally focussed at joints of the body. Physiotherapists often tend to mobilise joints as they are not usually trained in joint manipulation. However, in recent years many physiotherapists are being taught manipulation. Chiropractors typically manipulate joints but they also choose to mobilise them, particularly in older, fragile or more acute patients.

Whilst I didn’t learn any new techniques this time, I thought it was a valuable experience to share with my patients.