Graston Technique Sydney

Graston Technique is used specifically for the diagnosis and treatment of soft tissue. The Graston Technique utilises stainless steel apparatus in combination with therapeutic active movements to restore range of motion. The tools are used as an extension to manual therapy, they are more precise and accurate in amplifying any fibrotic changes in soft tissue. This allows the practitioner to accurately localise and treat the patient’s areas of discomfort. The mobilisation of soft tissue reduces the formation of scar tissue, fascial restrictions, and chronic inflammation. By breaking down these lesions the inflammatory process is stimulated leading to an increase in healing, reduced need for pain medication, and less time in rehabilitation.

The Graston Technique is used widely in the US in competitive sports such as the NBA, NHL, NFL, and Minor League Baseball trainers. The technique can be used for a wide range of pathologies ranging from Tennis Elbow and Shin splints to trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome and osteoarthritis.

For all people wanting to have Graston Technique Therapy, please take special care to come appropriately dressed. Your therapist will need direct skin access to your area of complaint. Please note that Graston Therapy is not effective through clothing. We advice men and women wishing to have Graston Technique Therapy over the gluts, hips, and adductor region

If you would like to experience Graston Technique, book online with Tom as he is the only accredicted Graston Technique Therapist in Sydney.

 

I’m not in pain, so why am I seeing a Chiropractor?

Why physical therapy is recommended for patients not necessarily in pain, frequency of care and how to speed your recovery.

Traditionally, people only seek physical treatment once they’re in pain. Pain, for most people, is the only sign that something is wrong. There are, however, many other signs of poor or compromised health unnoticed by the average person. These include: reduced flexibility in muscles, changing posture, weight gain/loss, muscle wasting; imbalance; weakness or tightness, poor co-ordination, clumsiness, and tiredness in performing normal daily duties.

Even if these signs are noticed, you might only act on them once they’re really bad. The point is that the absence of pain does not necessarily denote the absence of a problem. This is why patients of health practitioners, particularly chiropractors, sometimes don’t understand why they are either being treated, or returning for more treatment.

Most people accept that acute injuries have their respective timeframes for treatment and recovery. Once pain subsides however, patients struggle with the concept that further treatment is necessary to ‘maintain health, or ‘prevent further injury’. You may have heard some of these phrases being used, ‘maintenance care’, ‘performance care’, or ‘tune-ups’. These are terms used to encourage patients to return for more treatment within a certain time frame to prevent further injury and ensure on-going good health. Whether an individual chooses to visit a health practitioner on a regular basis or not, is a question of how much importance that individual places on health.

Good health is essential to elite athletes as much as it is to an office worker. The challenge lies in establishing a synergy between doctor and patient. The doctor must be competent, honest and trustworthy, and the patient must be motivated, hard-working and committed to rehabilitation. In this way, the doctor strives to get you better as quickly as possible, while you adhere to the treatment plan and home therapy techniques.

There are too many cases where patients have felt they have been overscheduled by their health professional, and hence, cease treatment. Similarly, patients won’t show any progress if they choose to ignore good advice with regard to scheduling, activity modification and exercise prescription. To ensure you are not overscheduled, make sure your health professional can justify the frequency of your visits, and endeavour to hold your end of the bargain by completing your assigned ‘self-help homework’.

People should recognise we are creatures of habit. Every so often, our bodies become fed up with our monotonous ways, at which point, you could benefit greatly from physical therapy. There is not so much a feeling of pain as there is widespread discomfort, or a sense of ‘misalignment’ within the joints and muscles. This generalised feeling comes at different times for individual people. It may be monthly or bimonthly. It largely depends on how active or inactive you are, and the physical forces your body is subjected to each day.

Preventing injury relies on finding the ideal balance between work, exercise and appropriate physical treatment. As everyone works and exercises in different proportions, it is essential that health professionals tailor their treatment somewhat to allow for more versus less active individuals. In short, some patients need more, others need less, but everyone can benefit physically by having someone monitor their physical condition on a regular basis.

*DISCLAIMER: This discussion does not provide medical advice. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained in this discussion are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this discussion is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in this blog.

Acute and chronic pain

Understanding the difference between acute and chronic pain.

Acute injuries occur suddenly during activity. This might be during sport (spraining your ankle), at home (gardening) or in the office, such as in lifting poorly and incurring back pain. There are a multitude of acute injuries that could occur through a multitude of circumstances. Just about every part of your body, (bones, muscles, joints and ligaments), is potentially subject to suffering an acute injury. The majority of these acute injuries occur during recreation (strained hamstrings, pulled achilles tendons, rotator cuff niggles, etc). These are all just a few examples of the types of injuries I have treated. It’s very hard to estimate recovery timeframes for acute injuries as they are so varied in nature and depend largely on severity. They could be two weeks or two months in some cases.

If you’re someone who has experienced an acute injury some time ago, but is still suffering the effects of that injury today, then it’s likely your injury has become chronic. Chronic injuries are not necessarily preceded by an acute injury to the same region however, these injuries typically result from overusing one area of the body. The most common scenarios include whilst playing a sport or exercising over a long period, or through placing repetitive stress through your body such as in prolonged sitting at work. Chronic injuries are probably more prevalent than what most people realise. Most people, regardless of their vocation, are likely to perform repetitive tasks on a daily basis.

Imagine, if you will, the coffee barista. In terms of muscular effort and the force or stress placed through the body, it doesn’t take much effort to make one coffee, but think how many coffees a barista would make in a day, probably hundreds! So, by the end of the week, the month, the year, the coffee barista has placed a significant amount of stress through the body. The barista may or may not suffer any pain or apparent injury at this time, but it’s certainly conceivable that he or she will do so eventually. The same would apply to the construction worker, the tennis coach, the typist, the tailor, the barber, the bus driver, even the chiropractor, God forbid!

The trouble with chronic injuries is their insidious development. Like a stealth bomber, they fly above the radar and ultimately, cause havoc. The other problem with chronic injuries is that people rarely recognise the repetitive nature of their jobs and past-times. People are thus unaware of the potential they have to influence injury. Lastly, people tend to respond only to pain, and chronic injuries don’t become painful until the damage is significantly progressed. In this way, people present themselves to the health professional in need of more treatment than what they had anticipated. The toughest thing for patients to understand is that chronic injuries develop over a long time, and therefore often take longer to fix.

It’s easy for the lay person to recognise that, upon twisting their ankle or hurting their low back whilst lifting, they need immediate help. The take-home message here is, that whilst you may be fortunate enough to have avoided an injurious accident, your weekly activities could be following a path of injury. Conduct a basic assessment of your work, hobby or sporting interest. Think of any repetitive movements or postures you perform regularly, or on a daily basis. This could include any movement where you use one side of your body more so than the other such as in leaning on one leg, twisting to a preferred side, or using the same arm to perform tasks etc. The same applies to postures you might assume in the classroom or the office.

If you suspect you’re wearing your body away doing the same old thing time and time again, see your (health professional)[http://tomcartwright.com/blog/chiropractor-north-sydney] for advice. He or she should be able to offer effective treatment for any pain relief, but also suggest some self-help strategies, therapeutic home exercises and other general exercise advice.

*DISCLAIMER: This discussion does not provide medical advice. The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained in this discussion are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this discussion is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in this blog.